Category Archives: adhd cure

Bacon and Celery Root Egg Skillet

Bacon and Egg Skillet MLM

 

Didn’t even get the word leeks to fit into that fully stuffed title.

This casserole/skillet will leave you just as deliciously filled and nutritiously plump. Oh wait, it’s low carb and keto friendly so plump is never on the menu. 

Eat delicious foods that keep your body at a weight losing detox is the slogan of the keto world. We up those fats and cut the carbs to where every bite is fully sweetened with only the subtleties of food flavor.

This skillet cuts potatoes and instead uses celery root. I use this veggie wonder of low carb nighthood to make up for the lack of potato in my life all the time. At this point the potato seems dull in comparison to my favorite veggie. I cut it into fries and just fry them in a cast iron with salt and oil. I put them into stews and even spiralize them into soups. Celery Root even freezes well. What more could you ask of nature? Celery root’s main awakening into my mental food cookbook happened after having them in this celery root chicken and mushroom alfredo. Once you go celery you never go potato again…except when you twin brings home leftover BBQ stuffed into a potato and you really want that BBQ?

Holidays just make carbs  soooo accessible. I miss the keto feels of mind clarity and body readiness though, so I’m kickstarting back into the low carb world with this skillet.

The celery root has more crunch to it’s munch than the easily softened potato, but I love how the root gets soft and absorbs up all the flavor you can offer it, but still keeps some of its crunchy texture. The longer you cook it the softer it gets, but I recommend cutting a few strips off before making this dish and eat a piece raw, a piece raw and salted, and a piece that’s been cut into a fry shape and heated in the skillet for about two minutes on each side. That way you get to fully experience what this root can offer you.

Bacon and Celery Root Egg Skillet.jpg

 

Ingredients:

4 Strips Bacon

7 Eggs

1/4 Teaspoon Salt

1/4 Cup Coconut Butter

1 Cup Celery Root (chopped or sliced)

1/4 Cup Chopped Leek Leaves (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees.
  2. Cook the bacon mostly through and then set aside (will finish cooking in skillet).
  3. Pour about two tablespoons of the grease into a tiny saucepan and gently melt it with the coconut butter.
  4. Beat the eggs and then add in the celery root, leek, and chopped bacon.
  5. Cook over medium heat for about three minutes and then pour the melted coconut butter and bacon grease over the eggs.
  6. Transfer the skillet to the oven to finish cooking for about 10-15 minutes. I like my eggs barely cooked through so if they taste undercooked just pop them in for about five more minutes. Avoid overcooking though because they start to taste hard.

 

 

Make it paleo by foraging for it outside. You could even hide it and let your friends find it for ultimate cavemaning. Tools required: Spatula.

Foraged Skillet

 

Advertisements

Slow Cooker Spiced Pear Cider

Final Slow Cooker Spiced Pear Cider

In ‘making this recipe up land’ I’ve discovered that throwing random fall spices into a slow cooker for cider feels the same as imagining out spices for baking. In your mind the flavors fuse together as you toss them into the bowl, and you can just taste the future flavors ahead. Eventually, after you experiment and come to know these slow cooker cider recipes, you can make ones that revolve around your mouth’s desires, especially if you’re like me and love tons of cinnamon in your drink (benefits of the single life do include having everything taste the way only you want, without having to care about others’ mouths).

I have  a confession you can’t tell the other white ladies. I’ve grown a bit weary of the pumpkin spice. It has been used in the slow cooker apple cider, and the cookie pumpkin dough, the pumpkin spice ketchup

 

Since time is rolling into the holidays I decided to use up the last of the spices in my little bags and see what nature could fondle together with some pears, anise, cloves, cinnamon, and why not some garam masala?

My mouth is so glad this concoction was fused together.

Pear Cider

All of the spicy sweetness you could want comes through with each sip, and you get a little twist for a holiday drink that will make all of your guests feel they’ve stepped into the great hall for a feast. If you all wear your house scarves and serve this with pumpkin pasties (coming soon 😉 , then call me so I can join.

If you want to be more traditional then you can definitely stick with the spices in the slow cooker apple cider and just substitute out the apples for pears.

Rawr

I personally prefer the pears now because they have a more seductive and deep taste that goes well with fall spices, but I’ve honestly always preferred pears to apples.

This cider is so inspiringly delicious I’ve already made a cocomilk pear spiced latte, pear spiced brownies…I totally left the oven on. Woops *texts roomy to please turn off oven*. Woot technology and slow baking(I’ve been baking at low temps lately for thorough heating and close to god level deliciousness). 

Pear cider cocomilk

Soon there will be a pear spiced cake. Keep your mouths watering. 

Pear Cider Ingredients

Ingredients:

4-5 Pears (I used bosc pears)

1 Tablespoon Whole Anise

2 Teaspoons Whole Cloves

3 Cinnamon Sticks

1 Tsp Garam Masala Powder

7-9 Cups Fresh Filtered Water (Quality Matters)

 

 

Visual Tutorial

  1. Compile all of your spices and pears together:

Pear Cider Ingredients

2.   Chop your pears into quarters:

Chopped Pears

3.  Put the pears into the slow cooker and fill up with water:

Into the Pot

 

4.  Dump all of your spices into a nut bag or directly into the slow cooker (to be strained out later:

IMG_20151123_192527

5.   Cook on low for six hours or high for three hours

6.   On the last hour smash the pears against the side of your slow cooker.

7.   Take out the spice bag or strain through a colander over a large pot.

8.   To serve simply warm in the slow cooker and serve to overjoyed guests.

Serve

Cocomilk (Coconut Milk) Recipe and Guide

Cocomilk Final

If you are looking for the freshest tasting coconut milk bliss then you have come to the right words. I’ve scoured the Internet cookbook, (basically food blogs) and realized there is a need for another coconut milk tutorial. When making a blog post I try to keep with ideas that are new and contribute to the world of food, rather than retell food stories that are already on the Internet or in books, and honestly there are a lot of coconut milk tutorials already all over the Internet’s pages.

 There are many cocomilk tutorials that get the basics down, but I have a few personal tips and tricks that will be valuable to your coconut milk making experience.

1.   Coconut Flake Size Matters

2.   Use Just Beneath Scalding Water (110 degrees is optimal)

3.   If You Use This Milk In Recipes Be Sure to Use the Cream

4. Vanilla Changes Everything

5.   Drink or Bake with Within Three to Four Days

6.  Use the Coconut Pulp

7.  Use a Wide Mouth Container for Storage

Raw Cocomilk

1.   The first tip is that the size of the coconut flakes matters. Obviously tiny shredded coconuts will be packed into a cup and have more coconut volume than large flakes, but I didn’t realize this until making coconut milk with the same ratio of large coconut flakes to small flakes. The result was a pretty watery milk that didn’t compare to the full on mouth bliss I’d come to know. My mouth already knew what full tasting coconut milk was, and thus could not be deceived by this coconut watery perpetrator of mouth lies.

Measuring the coconut out into grams would be an excellent way to get the right ratio for this milk, but I do not have a scale and I’m sure a lot of others don’t either. So cups it is (to be updated in the future with grams once I get a scale).

2.   You definitely want to use warm water when you make the milk because room temperature water causes the cream to stick to the edges of your blender. If you do use room temp water by accident then just use a plastic thingy to scrape out the coconut cream and add it to your cream or just eat it as is.

3.  When using this milk you really want the fullness of the flavor to come through.  The delicious fat of the milk solidifies to the top of your milk when it gets cold and forms a layer on the top. To get to the milk I just poke a hole through the cream, pour out the milk, and then add some of the cream.

4.   You can easily add other extracts, but vanilla harmonizes with coconut like a melody of a goddess.

5.   You will easily be able to smell when this milk goes sour, and it happens really quickly. This also means the flavor is incredibly fresh tasting if you consume it in time, and it will be hard not to anyways 😉

6.  I let my bag hang outside overnight and turn it into cocopulp crackers, or just use it for texture in fat bombs. There are tons of other uses for it though, such as the ones found in this word.

7.  I save up old containers and use them to store my coconut milk, apple cider or kombucha. The old Trader Joe’s jar is actually perfect for this. Use glass containers for warm liquids, but plastic is fine once they are room temperature or cold.

 

 

Ingredients:

Ingredients

1.5 – 2 Cups Shredded Unsweetened Coconut

or

3-3.5  Cups Large Flaked Unsweetened Coconut

4 Cups Barely Scalding Water/ 110 Degrees F (If boiling it could explode out of the blender)

Cheesecloth or Nut Milk Bag (I use this hemp one)

Raw Cocomilk 2

Directions:

  1. Combine your coconut and water in a high speed blender.
  2. Blend on high for a few minutes.
  3. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag (found here), or cheesecloth.
  4. If making more milk put the pulp back in your blender, add more coconut and repeat.
  5. Dry out your cocopulp by hanging the bag outside and either make coconut flour or use the pulp for texture.
  6. Drink within 3-4 days.

 

Expanded 7.

Use Me Bottles

In the fridge your coconut milk will separate and make a cream. You can whip this up for coconut whipped cream, or just add the cream into your morning warm cocomilk. (I do this a lot and just add a dash of vanilla for flavor).

Large Jar

If you use an old bottle with a short mouth the cocomilk winds up hardening and you have to either stab into the bottle with a long knife or heat up the bottle in water on the stove. I do this if I’ve run out of jars. 

Small Bottle

 

Happy cocomilking.

When finished put on fuzzy socks and go take pictures of your epicness outside.

Fuzzy

Cocomacanut Traveling Fat Bomb

The sound for this taste is lorsmun with a bliss tinkerings bracing the lor and leading into the smu. A mind lifting purr of pleasure.

I’ve made many a fat bomb in my little existence. In oddity I’ve never made macadamia butter into these mouthgasms. Strange due to my deep love of the macadamia. You can taste the satisfying pour of fats from its goddess insides into your mouth. It doesn’t even know me so this love is purely from my mind to yours. I daresay I’m killing more by telling you this so I’m being quite cruel to my love.

I even want all mouths to experience her deepest moments.

Traveling fat bombs are so ingenious I still barely believe I came up with them. It was purely by change really. I made energy bites from All Day I Dream About Food and then put them in an empty coffee can from Trader Joe’s. I then put some pistachio fat bombs from The Healthy Foodie on top of those and then off to the rolling road I went. The trip wound up being longer than expected and I was hungry. I tried a two day car heated fat bomb and found it even more delicious than when it was ripe from the fridge. The flavors had soaked and warmed together to bring out new notes of flavors and they melted into my tongue.

They wound up lasting five days and still being incredible.

Since then I’ve just analyzed into a simple noticement. None of the ingredients have a short shelf life.

Since this discovery I never take a roadtrip without a jar of traveling fat bombs goodness. I actually sometimes leave a jar in the car just in case sporadic hunger hits at any traveling moment. This one beasts the Brazillian nut coffee bomb so hard though. Try this one first and tell your mouth to thank me ;). Really you should think the macadamia though, but I’m sure we can have a threesome.

The base recipe.

The Inner Moments

3/4 Cup Roasted Macadamia Butter (How to: Make Your Own)

1/4 Cup Coconut Butter (How to: Make Your Own)

 2 T Coffee (Quality matters, I used a delightful coldbrew but a Chemex or French Press would do well)

1/4 Cup Unsweetened Shredded Coconut (Optional)

1/4 teaspoon ceylon cinnamon up to 1 teaspoon based on preference (Start small, taste, increase if desired)

1/4 teaspoon vanilla (I used Madagascar bourbon vanilla)

To Make it Come

Together

Pulse the above together in a food processor to desired consistency and store in a fresh jar, or reuse nut butter jar.

Macadamia and Coconut Fat Bomb Final