Tag Archives: dairyfree

Savory Chocolate Brussels

I used to flip dairy fairy cartwheels out when my favorite food bloggers would go days without posting. I’d not know what to eat so I spurted milk from my body to live on. Some of it made it into a glass.

I would say you should just stop listening but this is typed so you’d just have to stop reading when I get awkward with words.

I wouldn’t understand where my food bloggers had gone. How could my food mothers and other goddesses just leave me? I’d feel completely lost and just simper over to the stove to make bacon and eggs.  Then I would feel happy because bacon and eggs is always delicious.

Without their recipes to guide me I had no idea how to cook and I was even scared to do so. There were too many spice combinations I didn’t understand. What if there were carbs hiding in the spinach? Little carbs may have jumped out of the oranges, turned micro, and restructured the leaves. I didn’t know.

That was at the point where I was counting carbs and looking at food as equations rather than simply as food.

At first the body does need to relearn its intuitive knowledge of how to take care of itself. When first starting on keto I was still a sugar ravishing human that weighted 110 pounds and thus thought I was healthy. I had to rewire my brain’s pathways to accept that sugar was a drug. It turns out that drug keeps your body from knowing when your body is full. Your body thinks of the most vivid resource when hungry and sugar is one of the most vivid of all. My mouth dripped for chocolate at every thought of it and I’d eat without a stop once it made its way in.

I’d adapted to the point I did have the full feeling, but I’d eat sugar without being able to stop. Keto cured me of that by detoxing out the sugar and returning my body to itself. In a few weeks I’d finally reached a point of true food gauging. My body spoke to me about everything it desired. There was no fear impulse to scarf down a Crunchwrap Supreme or an uncontrollable urge to drink down a tub of ice cream after I let it melt a few hours and then topped it with Butterfingers. After being off sugar for months candy actually started to look like toys that I couldn’t understand as food. Why were people eating the toys in their Happy Meals? I’d realize quick but it still felt odd to watch.

I’ve fallen in and out of keto a lot the last couple of months. I’ve been writing in Marfa and been in a film festival in Sedona, so food was given to me often and I was broke so I just let it slip. Sedona was incredible and they fed us everyday as part of the VIP experience. I was in a film that was submitted and got in. The nurturing and wisdom that came from the town even inspired me to write them a letter called To the Sedars, The Sedona Counsel of Elders. I still need to hand write it on a scroll for them.

It hasn’t been horrid. It felt like cheating but with a very sexy donut. I didn’t slip that far, but I did find the most succulent chocolate molded into soft lumps with sparkling cayenne gently fondling their flavor. Oh my god these truffles were so rich and creamy and mmm I’m lost in the memory every time I touch it.  The oddest mind moments occurred when I would have sugar and then want to eat everything in edible sight. The toys became food again. I still keep caving to chocolate, and yesterday I even went too far in chocolate and wound up eating lots of chips too. Sigh. I’d only had an avocado, cheese, bacon and cabbage up to that point and was in full control. Then one bite of chocolate and I actually watched as my eyes turned everything to food that minutes before I hadn’t craved at all.

Today I’ve only had water and I’ll kill the cravings with green tea throughout the day’s hours. I want keto back like a drug addict knowing their cure.

Beginnings.jpg

Since typing that I finally found coconut oil and cocoa. Before this moment I had been craving chocolate and thought it was just for the sugar, but then realized I haven’t had red meat in days so I could be feeling cravings for the magnesium and iron. After the pure combo of cocoa and coconut oil touched my mouth an hour ago, and I felt my mouth melt to the taste, I now that was it. That prefrontal cortex song of nutrients soared through my brain like that first bite of steak. It tasted even better than tiny chocolate bars. Ha. Puny cocoa moments. I thought of them after and my brain laughed. The cravings were gone.

Moving.jpg

While in Marfa I did create a dish I can have forever in life, regardless of any restrictions I dare place on my mouth. I got high one night and had this block of pure cocoa. I also had just taken a small scoop of coconut into my hands and rubbed it into my cast iron, fully pushing it into the iron and soaking myself in the moment of my hands and oil meeting my favored cooking tool.

I then saw the bar of pure brown and picked it up, tried to eat off a chunk and realized it was too hard. My eyes cast themselves about the room and saw my heated iron just begging to be used. I turned up the heat and pushed the cocoa bar into the oil until it met the iron. It slowly melted in. The brown seeped into the pan and coated the black with melted chocolate. I was lost in it and just let it melt as I rubbed the bar deeper and deeper in as the bar got smaller and smaller in my hands while the chocolate poured off.  I held the bar with my right hand and my left finger nuzzled itself into the pan and scooped the chocolate into my mouth. Oh my savory bliss of earthenly pleasure. My eyes would not stay open in order to fully absorb themselves into the taste with me.

 

At first my mind yelled that it would be hard to get out and said I shouldn’t use the whole thing! Thoughts melted away, unable to penetrate the flavor the oil and chocolate were making.

Butter Cocoa.jpg

Time lost itself as I let the bar melt all the way in and got a spoon. I dashed salt on top and just stood there, body leaned in with elbows on the counter as I spooned bite by bite into my mouth. I was still in full control as the pleasure melted into my senses and I got lost in pure chocolate. Then I paused and decided to get Brussels in on this. I opened the fridge and pulled out the tiny green leaves bunched into a shell, carved them open and then in fourths and placed them in the melted chocolate. I heated them over medium high and watched them turn crispy in the cocoa, pushing them about the pan as they told me what to do.

Push Me.jpg

Crispy Brussels leaves soaked in chocolate is such a delicious crunching seduction. Sprinkle salt on top and you have all your senses could want.

Oh and the cocoa comes right out. My cast iron was more clean after it than before. If any sticks just add more oil and fry things in it. I left some in the pan and fried an egg on top of it the next morning. It was so flipping eggwheels good.

Cocoa Egg

 

Cocoa Buttered Brussels

Final Chocolate Coated Brussels.jpg

Ingredients:

Brussels Sprouts

1/4 Bar of cocoa (or 2 T of cocoa powder)

About 2 Tablespoons Coconut oil (or butter)

Directions:

Melt chocolate into cast iron by either adding coconut oil to the pan and melting your cocoa paste into it, or adding butter to the pan with cocoa powder.

Chop the Brussels into quarters and fry them in the chocolate, pushing them around occasionally with hands or a spoon, for about six minutes. Try them randomly to see how cooked you like them, Brussels need to be crispy with a barely soft inside, but that’s just my preference.

Advertisements

Low Carb Slow Cooker Spaghetti Squash with Chocolate Stout Meatballs

Chocolate Stout Meatballs with Slow Cooker Spaghetti Squash.jpg

Now there are some things that you give up when you go low carb. You say pish posh to bread and its lack of nutrients. You even scold it for taking away from the flavor in burgers. Meat is the true mouth king there.

You do cry at giving up fruit, but your taste buds bow to you within weeks. They appreciate the subtleties in berries and your body loves still being in control.

I never cared for pasta.

The thing I still love in moderation is beer, specifically Icelandic beer. I have a deep infatuation for Iceland. The music makes me dance, the water makes my soul sing and drip out magic and the images of the place get permasoaked into my mind.

This is my favorite 8 tracks playlist of Icelandic tunes.

If you are gluten free as well then they have some gluten free beer already on the market. If you aren’t low carb you could even use cider. I let in a couple of vices in order to make this diet a lifestyle. Beer and the occasional sip of root beer are these vices. Oh and Trader Joe’s green tea mochi. Oh my soft mouthgasm happiness. Mochi ice cream.

Mochi is the main reason I love Japan. A tiny life goal of mine is to make the keto version. Sadly the main flour ingredient is rice.

I still keep it under twenty carbs a day for the sake of keto, and because that’s right where my body loses control and asks for cupcakes.

I mean….we can still have cupcakes. Just keto cupcakes. There’s this stain of strawberry cupcakes in my head though. Wal-Mart ones. I super cheated the first week of keto and ate like twenty cupcakes….*cough* They were so good. Now that I no longer like the taste of sugar those get to remain a memory. When you have old favorites after curbing that sugar addiction your memories get soiled and you have to spit out the taste. Those cupcakes get to remain a delicious mind memory.

Eventually you stop even craving fluff though, your body just asks for meat and veggies and its all it wants. Takes years but it is incredible feeling.

Now on this chocolate stout slow cooker spaghetti squash and meatballs. This memory will always be delicious and it will even deeply take your mouth for years to come. The chocolate and beer both give you earthy flavors that get to soak into the spaghetti squash. I added some fresh thyme for some flavor lifting, but if you just want that chocolate and stout manly vibe then don’t even bother.

This recipe is deeply inspired by I Breathe I’m Hungry’s low carb bison balls in red onion and chocolate stout gravy.

For the Meatballs

1 Pound Ground Beef or Primal Blend

1 Happy Egg

2 Tablespoons Coconut Flour or 1/3 Cup Almond Flour

1 Tsp Worcestershire Sauce

1/2 Tsp Cocoa Powder

1/4 Tsp Cinnamon or Allspice

1 Tbs Avocado or Coconut Oil

1 Cup Chopped Broccoli (Optional)

1 Tsp Salt (Salt once in ball form to keep it on the outside)

For the Gravy:

2 Tbs Butter (Preferably Kerrygold for ultimate mouth seduction)

1/2 Cup Red Onions

1 Cup Dark Beer (Or wine, or beef broth)

2 Tbs Butter (Added at the End)

For the Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

1.5 Cups water or

1 Tbs Avocado or Coconut Oil (if using oven)

Directions:

  1. Prick the squash with a fork 10-15 times. Pop the whole spaghetti squash into the slow cooker with 1.5 cups water and cook on low  four to six hours or high for three to four hours. Alternatively bake in the oven by cutting it in half and cooking it in a baking dish with oil for 40 minutes at 375 degrees.
  2. Thirty minutes before the squash is finished cooking start the meatballs. It will need 15-30 minutes to cool and the meatballs take about 45 minutes.
  3. Combine all the meatball ingredients, except the salt and the oil. Form them into 15 balls and then sprinkle salt on each ball.
  4. Heat your oil in a cast iron and cook the meatballs for 2-3 minutes on each side or until browned on each side. Remove the meatballs and add the butter to your pan. Toss in your onions and let them soften. Add the broccoli and let it sear a minute. Season with salt and add beer. Stir the meatballs and everything together.
  5. Cover, I used tin foil to cover it, and let it simmer. I let it simmer about ten minutes and it was already reduced perfectly, but mine seemed to go fast. Watch carefully. Remove the cover and let it simmer until reduced, stir in the butter and reduce to your texture desires. Stir in the butter.
  6. Remove the guts of the spaghetti squash and either pour the meatballs and broccoli directly in, and use the spaghetti squash as a bowl, or pull out the pasta and top with meatballs and chocolate stout beer gravy.

Visual Guide:

Enjoy 😉

Nutritional Info for 5 Servings with Guinness

Calories: 427, Fat: 29.3 g, Sodium: 210.2 g, Total Carb: 13.4, Net Carb: 10

 

 

Low Carb Bison and Whiskey Burger

If you’re looking for a new whiskey to add to your favorites then I’m just going to take over that decision for you. It’s going to be Garrison Brother’s.

They’re also from Texas so our roots grow us together. 

My wonderful parents gifted me a bottle for Christmas and now I’m cooking with it in anything that seems able to soak up whiskey. I mostly add a dash of it to my onions as they’re browning and just let the flavor soak right in. The taste is full bodied and sinks all the way into your mouth and even soaks the back of your throat.

Now this burger takes everything good in life, not counting everything just as good, and brings them it together for one meat and alcohol deep mouthgasm of a moment. The whiskey gets time to soak into the meat overnight and my mouth thinks it brings the flavors of both to a new level of pleasure.

I live the single keto life so I just made enough for one, but you can easily increase the amounts based on your human feeding needs.

 

Final Bison Whiskey Burger

 

Ingredients

1/4 Pound Bison Meat

1/2 Teaspoon Bourbon Whiskey 

1/2 Teaspoon Worcestershire

1/4 Teaspoon Salt (or to taste)

1 Tablespoon Butter or Coconut Oil

2 Teaspoons Chopped Onions

1 Fried Egg (optional)

Dash of Salt

 

Egg and Bison

Directions

  1. Combine the bison meat, whiskey, and worcestershire and let them marinate together in the fridge overnight.
  2. Take the meat out to rest for thirty minutes. When there’s ten minutes left slowly heat the onion in the oil or butter.
  3. Combine the onions and bison meat together and turn the heat to medium.
  4. Crack an egg in the pan to fry with some oil
  5. Cook the meat in the onion oil to your preferred level. I cooked it about two minutes on each side at medium heat for a rare burger.
  6. Add salt to the burger (apparently we’re supposed to do it after rather than marinate the burger with salt to retain moisture)
  7. Add a dash of salt to the egg and put it on top of the burger.

 

 

Spaghetti Squash Egg in a Nest

Spaghetti Squash Egg in  Nest MLM.jpg

 

Spaghetti squash is that staple of the modern keto / low carb diet that you just know is going to last through the century.

It’s our version of always having a pack of noodles in the cupboard that are always ready to be made into a meal. The ingredients can even change all over it and yet that staple can be used for all of your flavors, from basil to beer braised meatballs.

What you really want in a noodle is a texture that compliments meats and sauces, and a flavor that simply absorbs other flavors, or simply remains in the dish as a layer of texture to enhance the other ingredients.

There’s definitely a shorter shelf time when you compare spaghetti squash to wheat noodles, but there’s more life to the squash, and it lends that oh so delicious health factor to the dish.

I make a squash about once a week, and after using half for some spaghetti squash and meatballs, I’ll use the other half for whatever experiment my mouth wants.

Some of them plotz, like the cinnamon and coconut cream one, but others leave me dedicated to their taste. This spaghetti squash swirled into a nest with an egg inside of it was just simple enough to be perfect on all layers. Each ingredient gets to beckon itself into your mouth and leaves nothing else but pure flavor inside you. I foresee many more recipes coming from this base idea. An egg and spaghetti squash are incredible textures with amazing health benefits in them, but they are also able to take on whatever flavor you’re feeling that day. For this recipe I used sun dried tomatoes, and they release that perfect tomato flavor, without all the juice of a fresh one, but you could try any flavor you have on hand.

Spaghetti Squash and Tomatoes Egg in a Nest MLM.jpg

 

Ingredients:

2 Tablespoons Oil or Butter

3/4 Cup Cooked Spaghetti Squash

1 Egg

1 Tablespoon Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Dashes of Salt (to taste)

1/2 Teaspoon Dried Rosemary (or whatever spice you have on hand)

 

Directions:

  1. Heat up oil in a cast iron or non stick pan  and form the spaghetti squash nest on top of it (I have a large cast iron and formed the nest and then poured the oil into the noodles so that it would all be in one spot).
  2. Push the tomatoes into the layers of the squash wherever you like, or chop them into small pieces and sprinkle them all over it.
  3. Crack an egg into the center and let it warm through your desired level of cooked egg.
  4. Sprinkle on salt and any other spices you want.

 

Bacon and Celery Root Egg Skillet

Bacon and Egg Skillet MLM

 

Didn’t even get the word leeks to fit into that fully stuffed title.

This casserole/skillet will leave you just as deliciously filled and nutritiously plump. Oh wait, it’s low carb and keto friendly so plump is never on the menu. 

Eat delicious foods that keep your body at a weight losing detox is the slogan of the keto world. We up those fats and cut the carbs to where every bite is fully sweetened with only the subtleties of food flavor.

This skillet cuts potatoes and instead uses celery root. I use this veggie wonder of low carb nighthood to make up for the lack of potato in my life all the time. At this point the potato seems dull in comparison to my favorite veggie. I cut it into fries and just fry them in a cast iron with salt and oil. I put them into stews and even spiralize them into soups. Celery Root even freezes well. What more could you ask of nature? Celery root’s main awakening into my mental food cookbook happened after having them in this celery root chicken and mushroom alfredo. Once you go celery you never go potato again…except when you twin brings home leftover BBQ stuffed into a potato and you really want that BBQ?

Holidays just make carbs  soooo accessible. I miss the keto feels of mind clarity and body readiness though, so I’m kickstarting back into the low carb world with this skillet.

The celery root has more crunch to it’s munch than the easily softened potato, but I love how the root gets soft and absorbs up all the flavor you can offer it, but still keeps some of its crunchy texture. The longer you cook it the softer it gets, but I recommend cutting a few strips off before making this dish and eat a piece raw, a piece raw and salted, and a piece that’s been cut into a fry shape and heated in the skillet for about two minutes on each side. That way you get to fully experience what this root can offer you.

Bacon and Celery Root Egg Skillet.jpg

 

Ingredients:

4 Strips Bacon

7 Eggs

1/4 Teaspoon Salt

1/4 Cup Coconut Butter

1 Cup Celery Root (chopped or sliced)

1/4 Cup Chopped Leek Leaves (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees.
  2. Cook the bacon mostly through and then set aside (will finish cooking in skillet).
  3. Pour about two tablespoons of the grease into a tiny saucepan and gently melt it with the coconut butter.
  4. Beat the eggs and then add in the celery root, leek, and chopped bacon.
  5. Cook over medium heat for about three minutes and then pour the melted coconut butter and bacon grease over the eggs.
  6. Transfer the skillet to the oven to finish cooking for about 10-15 minutes. I like my eggs barely cooked through so if they taste undercooked just pop them in for about five more minutes. Avoid overcooking though because they start to taste hard.

 

 

Make it paleo by foraging for it outside. You could even hide it and let your friends find it for ultimate cavemaning. Tools required: Spatula.

Foraged Skillet

 

Cocobutter Clove Cookies

The bitter burst of winter clove is tamed into a bursting warmth of earth flavor in these coconut butter, pumpkin and clove cookies. 

I entered a cookie swap this year as a way to insert this little blog into the world. It is growing up and I think it is time for a coming out shindig with clove dresses and cookie hair pieces. There would be top hats with an extra brim in the form of a bowl that you could go around with while party people snatched up cookies at their mouth’s desire. 

You might think in your sprog that a little low carb and paleo human could not be part of a cookie swap, but it worked out super well. I was sent delicious almond cookies, ginger snap cookies, and some other cookies that accidentally fell to the ground after my roomies dogs figured out how to knock them from the table. 

Cocobutter Pumpkin Cookies

I can’t wait for the day where food has no labels but for being food. I can add so many diet labels to these when in reality all they are is coconut butter and pumpkin sweetly molded together with a burst of clove. So simple and yet so bold.

When only going for the qualitiest of ingredients one must learn how to be simple with recipes.

Even adding salt can flow out the pennies from your wallet, but when every ingredient is delicious you also get the best flavors. There is no compensation or need to hide any ingredient. Instead you can feature the ingredients and let them burst into yours and your guest’s mouths.

Coconut butter is a newer trend and is still costing a pretty penny to purchase, but making your own is super easy if you have time and a food processor or blender. You could also use a nut butter for these if you don’t feel like venturing into the delicious land of the coconut. Coconut lends a delicious level of sweet that is so natural you’ll want to turn into a cavewoman. There is no point to adding sweetener when you have the coconut. If you’re scared to venture out then you can go ahead and add the coconut sugar or honey, but I suggest trying them without it and sprinkling some on top if you change your mind. That way you get to try them without the sweetener but can still safely add some if you change your mind.

These cookies are also low carb, vegan, egg free, vegetarian, paleo, AIP friendly, Paleo friendly, gluten free, grain free, sugar free, nut free, and fodmap friendly. Serve these up at any party without fear, just don’t forget the brimming cookie top hats. 

 

Yield: 2 Dozen Cookies

Ingredients:

Cocobutter Cookies Ingredients.jpg

1 Cup Coconut Butter (DIY)

1/2 Cup Pumpkin Puree (DIY)

2 Teaspoons Cloves, Crushed into Tiny Bits (or pre-ground cloves)

Whole Cloves (1-2 per Cookie)

2 Tablespoons Coconut Sugar or Honey (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees for a slow bake or 350 for a quickie.
  2. Beat, or use a fork, to combine the cocobutter and pumpkin.
  3. Crush fresh cloves in a mortar and pestle into coarsely ground.
  4. Beat together the cloves and coconut sugar with the cocobutter and pumpkin.
  5. Lay the cookies out on a sheet. Since there are no lifters the size you make the cookies is the size they will turn out.
  6. Bake at 200 for 45-50  minutes or 350 for 12-15 minutes.
  7. Mouthgasm.

 

Visual Tutorial

  1. Preheat the oven.
  2. Beat the pumpkin puree and cocobutter together.
  3. Crush the cloves up:

Crushing Cloves

4. Combine all ingredients and then lay the cookies out onto a baking sheet:

Cookies on pan MLM

5. Press one or a couple of cloves into each cookie:

Cloved Cookie Sheet.jpg

 

 

 

Cocobutter Clove Cookies

Slow Cooker Spiced Pear Cider

Final Slow Cooker Spiced Pear Cider

In ‘making this recipe up land’ I’ve discovered that throwing random fall spices into a slow cooker for cider feels the same as imagining out spices for baking. In your mind the flavors fuse together as you toss them into the bowl, and you can just taste the future flavors ahead. Eventually, after you experiment and come to know these slow cooker cider recipes, you can make ones that revolve around your mouth’s desires, especially if you’re like me and love tons of cinnamon in your drink (benefits of the single life do include having everything taste the way only you want, without having to care about others’ mouths).

I have  a confession you can’t tell the other white ladies. I’ve grown a bit weary of the pumpkin spice. It has been used in the slow cooker apple cider, and the cookie pumpkin dough, the pumpkin spice ketchup

 

Since time is rolling into the holidays I decided to use up the last of the spices in my little bags and see what nature could fondle together with some pears, anise, cloves, cinnamon, and why not some garam masala?

My mouth is so glad this concoction was fused together.

Pear Cider

All of the spicy sweetness you could want comes through with each sip, and you get a little twist for a holiday drink that will make all of your guests feel they’ve stepped into the great hall for a feast. If you all wear your house scarves and serve this with pumpkin pasties (coming soon 😉 , then call me so I can join.

If you want to be more traditional then you can definitely stick with the spices in the slow cooker apple cider and just substitute out the apples for pears.

Rawr

I personally prefer the pears now because they have a more seductive and deep taste that goes well with fall spices, but I’ve honestly always preferred pears to apples.

This cider is so inspiringly delicious I’ve already made a cocomilk pear spiced latte, pear spiced brownies…I totally left the oven on. Woops *texts roomy to please turn off oven*. Woot technology and slow baking(I’ve been baking at low temps lately for thorough heating and close to god level deliciousness). 

Pear cider cocomilk

Soon there will be a pear spiced cake. Keep your mouths watering. 

Pear Cider Ingredients

Ingredients:

4-5 Pears (I used bosc pears)

1 Tablespoon Whole Anise

2 Teaspoons Whole Cloves

3 Cinnamon Sticks

1 Tsp Garam Masala Powder

7-9 Cups Fresh Filtered Water (Quality Matters)

 

 

Visual Tutorial

  1. Compile all of your spices and pears together:

Pear Cider Ingredients

2.   Chop your pears into quarters:

Chopped Pears

3.  Put the pears into the slow cooker and fill up with water:

Into the Pot

 

4.  Dump all of your spices into a nut bag or directly into the slow cooker (to be strained out later:

IMG_20151123_192527

5.   Cook on low for six hours or high for three hours

6.   On the last hour smash the pears against the side of your slow cooker.

7.   Take out the spice bag or strain through a colander over a large pot.

8.   To serve simply warm in the slow cooker and serve to overjoyed guests.

Serve